Saturday, May 05, 2012

A Great Prize Opportunity

You may know that I've been involved in judging some contests where teachers are able to show what they are doing in the classroom and potentially win an award. Since I'm all about recognizing good teaching, I couldn't say, "No" when
Alfred Thompson,  K-12 Computer Science Academic Relations manager for Microsoft, asked me to share the exciting news of the contest below. If you are, or know of, an innovative teacher who is making a difference for girls and women in the areas of math, computing or engineering, please encourage them to apply.

The A. Richard Newton Educator Award recognizes teaching practices, techniques or innovative and new education approaches that attract girls and women to math, computing, and engineering. The award recognizes the educators (either individuals or teams) as well as the practices in K12 or undergraduate education. The award carries a $5,000 prize and will be presented at the 2012 Grace Hopper Celebration for Women in Computing awards celebration on October 4, 2012 in Baltimore, Maryland. I know that many people on this list are engaged in these practices, and I hope you consider nominating your deserving colleagues for this award! More information, including details on how to submit a nomination, can be found at http://anitaborg.org/initiatives/awards/a-richard-newton-educator-award/

The deadline is May 15, 2012.

3 comments:

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Shaniqua Washington said...

I'm happy that you are going to be a judge. I'm even happier that teachers are being recognized for their attributions in helping female students succeed in predominately male subjects